Rosemary

Andrea Marah

The natural oil in freshly picked rosemary is highly fragrant and sticky. But it does more than just smell and taste amazing. It is supposed to have memory boosting, neuroprotective, and stimulating properties. This sticky resin (similar to pine resin), once processed, is also amazing in skincare products. The primary component of the resin believed to be beneficial is carnosic acid.

Carnosic Acid is said to possess anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and antioxidant properties.

Rosemary essential oil possesses a higher concentration of carnosic acid than rosemary oil extract. Making it the more potent of the two. The essential oil is believed to be very hydrating to the skin and aid in controlling oil production.

Rosemary oil extract, also called rosemary oleoresin extract, is a powerful antioxidant that only needs a small amount to be effective. It has been shown to be more effective than Vitamin E at maintaining the integrity of natural products.

It is a great ingredient to incorporate in facial products for oily or blemish-prone skin or as an antioxidant in oil-based formulations.

Find it in these recipes: Apple Cider Vinegar Soap

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Apple Cider Vinegar

Andrea Marah

Apple cider vinegar (commonly abbreviated as ACV) is a mild acidic solution that, on its own boasts, a myriad of beneficial properties for skin. Antimicrobial, pH balancing, and soothing for irritated skin.

Its active components are antibacterial and antifungal acetic acid and exfoliating malic acid, which is a type of alpha hydroxy acid.

It is a great ingredient to incorporate in soaps, oils, facial washes, shampoos, hair rinses, and toners.

Find it in these recipes: ACV Soap

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Sales Funnel

Andrea Marah

A sales funnel is a predetermined series of steps you will take your potential customers through to reach conversion (a sale). The funnel generally begins with initial brand discovery and follows them through to the sale.

Most often used for retargeting prospectives who have previously interacted with your brand.

 

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Leads and Lead Generation

Andrea Marah

A "lead" is a marketing term used to describes a potential customer

"Lead generation" is one's ability to attract prospective clients or customers to your business and sales funnel. Leads generally will fall into 3 categories: cold, warm, or hot.

  • cold leads - Are potential customers who have not yet interacted with your brand: either through disinterest or lack of exposure. Cold leads take the most effort to convert.
  • warm leads - Show interest in your brand but have not yet completed a sale. These leads tend to need some nudging or reassurance.
  • hot leads - Either have or are close to completing a sale. have converted to being customers by completing a sale

Someone who travels through your entire sales funnel but never had any intention of completing a sale is known as a "dead-end lead" because all that work lead to nothing.

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Allantoin

Andrea Marah

A naturally occurring compound found in both animal and plant derived sources. Allantoin is thought to possess several healing properties such as reducing scarring, 

Allantoin is major component in lanolin and corn silk

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Labeling

Andrea Marah

The FDA has strict guidelines in place for labeling soap and cosmetics. 

For a more detailed and complete breakdown of FDA labeling guidelines, browse Marie Gale's website at www.mariegale.com.

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Curing

Andrea Marah

In soapmaking, this term refers to the time bar soap must "rest" to dry out and all the lye to finish reacting. Curing soap produces a harder and milder bar. Some soaps such as hot process soaps may be ready to use in a couple of weeks, since the soap was cooked and it just needs time to mellow and for the extra water to evaporate out of the bar. For cold-process soapmaking, the general rule is four to six weeks or longer in a dry, well-ventilated area. Some soaps such as 100% olive oil Castille soaps benefit from a one to two year cure time.

For wax products such as wax melts and candles, curing is the time the fragrance, colorant, and wax need to bond and develop the cold and hot throw. Paraffin waxes can cure in as little as 24 hours. Soy waxes need about two weeks to cure.

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Clay & Mud

Andrea Marah

Clays and muds are natural powders mined from the earth itself and make wonderful additives to add to deodorant, masks, and soaps as they add a luxurious feel, beautiful colors, and absorbent properties to your formulations. Clay come from all over the world in a rainbow of colors due to their unique mineral compositions like calcium, selenium, silica, magnesium, iron, iron oxide, zinc, copper, silver, and more! They also have very different rates of absorption. Always make sure your clays are cosmetic grade and free of harmful metals and toxins by purchasing from a reputable distributor.

Try these colors:

  • white kaolin clay
  • French green clay
  • purple Brazilian clay
  • yellow Brazilian clay
  • red Brazilian clay
  • red Rhassoul clay
  • Moroccan red clay
  • Valdai or Cambrian Russian Blue clay
  • black Brazilian clay (not charcoal, actual black clay!)
  • rose and blush pink clay
  • Bentonite clay
  • Dead Sea mud clay
  • Glacial mud clay

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Trace and Acceleration

Andrea Marah

"Trace" is a soapmaking term used to describe the stages of emulsion when the there is no more risk of the oils and lye separating in the soap batter. It is achieved by vigorously mixing the mixture (most effectively by a stick or emulsion blender).

Trace is separated into the three distinct stages: thin, medium, and thick. Differentiating these stages is relatively subjective. Soap batter can progress from one stage to the next, sometimes within seconds, depending on a plethora of factors including but not limited to:

  • fragrance
  • colorants
  • additives
  • recipe
  • high temperature
  • over blending

"False trace" describes an instance where the oils and lye appear to be mixed but have not yet completely emulsified. This will result in separation. 

"Acceleration" is that instance where the soap batter seems to speed from emulsion to thick trace within seconds. In the case of "seizing", the soap batter has basically solidified in the mixing bowl, often before all the ingredients have been completely incorporated. This can result in the nightmare inducing "soap-on-a-stick".

 

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Ricing

Andrea Marah
Ricing is cause by fragrance oil when it reacts with the soap batter forming rice-like beads throughout the batter. Rigorous stick blending can help smooth the batter back out, but may lead to over blending. It is important to carefully read manufacturer's notes as they should indicate if a particular fragrance is predisposed to ricing.

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